Radar pioneers

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 72. Chapters: Robert Watson-Watt, History of radar, Maurice Wilkins, John W. Marchetti, Telecommunications Research Establishment, John Randall, Victor V. Tikhomirov, Mark Oliphant, Alfred Lee Loomis, W. A. S. Butement, Alan Blumlein, Leonard George Chapman, Bernard Lovell, Edward George Bowen, Reginald Victor Jones, Mikhail Aleksandrovich Bonch-Bruevich, Abram A. Slutskin, Henry Tizard, Leo C. Young, Robert Morris Page, Rudolf Kühnhold, Alan Lloyd Hodgkin, Pavel K. Oshchepkov, Wolfgang Martini, Wilhelm Runge, James Atkinson, John Tasker Henderson, Semion Braude, William R. Blair, Albert H. Taylor, Harold A. Zahl, Samuel Rabinovich, Peter Swerling, R. A. McConnell, Lawrence A. Hyland, Harry Boot, Stowe Nine Churches, Hans Hollmann, Albert Percival Rowe, Arnold Frederic Wilkins, Philip Dee. Excerpt: The history of radar starts with experiments by Heinrich Hertz in the late 19th century that showed that radio waves were reflected by metallic objects. This possibility was suggested in James Clerk Maxwell's seminal work on electromagnetism. However, it was not until the early 20th century that systems able to use these principles were becoming widely available, and it was German engineer Christian Huelsmeyer who first used them to build a simple ship detection device intended to help avoid collisions in fog (Reichspatent Nr. 165546). Numerous similar systems were developed over the next two decades. The name radar comes from the acronym RADAR, coined in 1940 by the U.S. Navy for public reference to their highly classified work in Radio Detection And Ranging. Thus, a true radar system must both detect and provide range (distance) information for a target. Before 1934, no single system gave this performance; some systems were omni-directional and provided ranging information, while others provided rough directional information but not range. A key development was the use of pulses that were timed to provide ranging, which were sent from large antennas that provided accurate directional information. Combining the two allowed for accurate plotting of targets. In the 1934-1939 period, eight nations developed, independently and in great secrecy, systems of this type: the United States, Great Britain, Germany, the USSR, Japan, the Netherlands, France, and Italy. In addition, Great Britain had shared their basic information with four Commonwealth countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa, and these countries had also developed indigenous radar systems. During the war, Hungary was added to this list. Progress during the war was rapid and of great importance, probably one of the decisive factors for the victory of the Allies. By the end of hostilities, the United States, Great Britain, Germany, the USSR, and Japan had a wide diversity of land- and sea-base

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Produktinformationen

Titel
Radar pioneers
Untertitel
Robert Watson-Watt, History of radar, Maurice Wilkins, John W. Marchetti, Telecommunications Research Establishment, John Randall, Victor V. Tikhomirov, Mark Oliphant, Alfred Lee Loomis, W. A. S. Butement, Alan Blumlein
Editor
EAN
9781155789279
ISBN
978-1-155-78927-9
Format
Kartonierter Einband
Herausgeber
Books LLC, Reference Series
Genre
Sonstiges
Anzahl Seiten
72
Gewicht
160g
Größe
H246mm x B189mm x T4mm
Jahr
2011
Untertitel
Englisch
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