The Wild Garden

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Zusatztext In his new book! The Wild Garden: Expanded Edition ! Darke teams up across the agestime-machine stylewith a kindred spirit: William Robinson. . . . Both men were ahead of their times. Garden Design This new edition is two books in one! and a handsome volume at that. Henry Mitchell said it all when he claimed gardeners owe all to William Robinson. We do! and this book is the perfect way to appreciate that statement. Gardens Illustrated This new! expanded edition. . . . is essential reading for today's ecologically minded gardens. Landscape Architecture I'm giving a big Thumbs Up to Rick Darke's updating of William Robinson's classic The Wild Garden . Garden Rant If there was but one book on our garden library shelf! William Robinson's The Wild Garden would be the single tome! at once revolutionary and oozing charm. . . . With photographer and writer Rick Darke's added chapters and insight! we understand more than ever the wisdom and urgency of Robinson's garden gospel. Chicago Tribune Rick Darke retains all the original's beautiful engraved illustrations while augmenting them with his own rich color photographs. Martha's Vineyard Times Rick Darke could well be Robinson's reincarnation. Ottawa Citizen Robinson's seminal work set forth a vision of the naturalistic approach that informed gardening for generations. . . . With photographer and writer Darke's added chapters and insight! we understand more than ever the wisdom and urgency of Robinson's garden gospel. Tuscaloosa News Will truly inspire you. Originally published in 1870! [it] remained in print for more than 50 years with a message that is just as revolutionary today. Wenatchee World Zusammenfassung Envisions a naturalistic approach to gardening. This book advocates the usage of hardy! locally adapted native and exotic plants that are arranged according to local growing conditions. It includes 112 color photographs by Rick Darke. It is intended for those who wish to know how we have arrived at an understanding of gardens. Informationen zum Autor Rick Darke is a landscape design consultant! author! lecturer! and photographer based in Pennsylvania who blends art! ecology! and cultural geography in the creation and conservation of livable landscapes. His projects include scenic byways! public gardens! corporate and collegiate campuses! mixed-use conservation developments! and residential gardens. Darke served on the staff of Longwood Gardens for twenty years and received the Scientific Award of the American Horticultural Society. His work has been featured in the New York Times and on National Public Radio. Darke is recognized as one of the world's experts on grasses and their use in public and private landscapes. For further information visit www.rickdarke.com. William Robinson (1838-1935) emigrated from Ireland at a young age and was rapidly welcomed into the top echelons of British horticulture and botany. By 1866 he was a Fellow in the Linnean Society! sponsored by his friend Charles Darwin. Already an expert on the flora of the British Isles! he traveled the breadth of North America by train in 1870! observing regional habitats and forging lasting connections with Charles Sargent! Asa Gray! Frederick Law Olmsted! and others of their stature. Robinson was just thirty-two when he first published The Wild Garden ! which has proved to be the most insightful! influential! and enduring of his many books and journals. Robinson's brilliance and enormous personal energy enabled him to become one of the most accomplished gardeners! editors! and publishers of his era! and he is often referred to as the Father...

“In his new book, The Wild Garden: Expanded Edition, Darke teams up across the ages—time-machine style—with a kindred spirit: William Robinson. . . . Both men were ahead of their times.” —Garden Design
 
“This new edition is two books in one, and a handsome volume at that. Henry Mitchell said it all when he claimed gardeners owe all to William Robinson. We do, and this book is the perfect way to appreciate that statement.” —Gardens Illustrated
 
“This new, expanded edition. . . . is essential reading for today’s ecologically minded gardens.” —Landscape Architecture

“I’m giving a big Thumbs Up to Rick Darke’s updating of William Robinson’s classic The Wild Garden.” —Garden Rant

“If there was but one book on our garden library shelf, William Robinson’s The Wild Garden would be the single tome, at once revolutionary and oozing charm. . . . With photographer and writer Rick Darke’s added chapters and insight, we understand more than ever the wisdom and urgency of Robinson’s garden gospel.” —Chicago Tribune
 
“Rick Darke retains all the original’s beautiful engraved illustrations while augmenting them with his own rich color photographs.” —Martha’s Vineyard Times
 
“Rick Darke could well be Robinson’s reincarnation.” —Ottawa Citizen

“Robinson’s seminal work set forth a vision of the naturalistic approach that informed gardening for generations. . . . With photographer and writer Darke’s added chapters and insight, we understand more than ever the wisdom and urgency of Robinson’s garden gospel.” —Tuscaloosa News

“Will truly inspire you. Originally published in 1870, [it] remained in print for more than 50 years with a message that is just as revolutionary today.” —Wenatchee World


Autorentext

Rick Darke is a landscape design consultant, author, lecturer, and photographer based in Pennsylvania who blends art, ecology, and cultural geography in the creation and conservation of livable landscapes. His projects include scenic byways, public gardens, corporate and collegiate campuses, mixed-use conservation developments, and residential gardens. Darke served on the staff of Longwood Gardens for twenty years and received the Scientific Award of the American Horticultural Society. His work has been featured in the New York Times and on National Public Radio. Darke is recognized as one of the world's experts on grasses and their use in public and private landscapes. For further information visit www.rickdarke.com.

William Robinson (18381935) emigrated from Ireland at a young age and was rapidly welcomed into the top echelons of British horticulture and botany. By 1866 he was a Fellow in the Linnean Society, sponsored by his friend Charles Darwin. Already an expert on the flora of the British Isles, he traveled the breadth of North America by train in 1870, observing regional habitats and forging lasting connections with Charles Sargent, Asa Gray, Frederick Law Olmsted, and others of their stature. Robinson was just thirty-two when he first published The Wild Garden, which has proved to be the most insightful, influential, and enduring of his many books and journals. Robinson's brilliance and enormous personal energy enabled him to become one of the most accomplished gardeners, editors, and publishers of his era, and he is often referred to as the Father of the English Flower Garden. Gravetye Manor, a sixteenth-century house which survives on over one-thousand acres in West Sussex, became his home and laboratory for developing and refining the wild garden concept.


Klappentext

“Rick Darke captures in text and brilliant photography the essence of Robinson's philosophy, now practiced virtually worldwide.” —Peter Herbert, consultant and former proprietor of Gravetye Manor 

“Rick Darke has done a great service to all gardeners in showing how Robinson's nineteenth-century classic is alive and relevant to us and our time.” —Noël Kinsbury, garden designer, author, lecturer

William Robinson’s revolutionary book, The Wild Garden, envisioned an authentically naturalistic approach to gardening that is more vital today than ever before. First published in 1870, The Wild Garden evolved through many editions and remained in print through the remainder of the author’s lifetime (1838–1935). In the book, Robinson issued a forceful challenge to the prevailing style of the day, which relied upon tender plants arranged in rigidly geometrical designs. In sharp contrast, Robinson advocated for the use of hardy, locally adapted native and exotic plants arranged according to local growing conditions. Robinson’s vision was inspired by his first-hand observations of natural habitats in Europe and North America, and he put his ideas into practice in his own garden at Gravetye Manor in West Sussex. The Wild Garden was ground-breaking and hugely influential in its day, and is stunningly relevant to twenty-first century gardeners and landscape stewards seeking to adopt sustainable design and management practices.
 
In addition to the complete original text and illustrations from the fifth edition of 1895, this expanded edition includes new chapters and 125 color photographs by award-winning photographer and landscape consultant Rick Darke. His new material places wild gardening in modern context, underscoring Robinson’s importance in the evolution of ecological design and illustrating an inspiring diversity of contemporary wild gardens.
 


Zusammenfassung
First published in 1870, The Wild Garden challenged the prevailing garden style of the day and advocated a naturalistic style, in which hardy plants, both native and exotic, are arranged in groupings that mimic wild landscapes. Thanks to Robinson’s passionate advocacy, the naturalistic style triumphed, and Robinson's urgent message continues to resonate today. For this newly designed edition, Rick Darke has written an introductory essay that not only underscores Robinson’s importance in the evolution of garden design and ecology, but also explains his relevance for today’s gardeners, designers, and landscape professionals. The book contains over 100 stunning photographs taken by Darke, including images of Gravetye and of modern “wild” gardens. 


Leseprobe
Introduction to William Robinson and the Expanded Edition of The Wild Garden
First published in 1870 and evolving through seven editions in William Robinson’s lifetime (1838–1935), The Wild Garden promoted an authentically naturalistic and genuinely low-maintenance approach based upon Robinson’s considerable experience as a gardener, a botanist, and a direct observer of diverse habitats. The book was ground-breaking and hugely influential in its day, and is stunningly relevant to twenty-first century gardeners and landscape stewards seeking to combine esthetic design with dynamic biological diversity and sustainable management practices.

Rich with humor and strong opinion, The Wild Garden’s text is full of spirit and speaks of Robinson’s enormous personal energy. A prolific writer and editor, the Irish-born Robinson made a successful career of telling the English how they might be more practical and imaginative gardeners—no mean trick in any day. When The Wild Garden first appeared, the prevailing taste in British and European Continental garden design was for meticulously contrived displays of tropical annuals newly introduced from South America. Robinson’s condemnation of this style as rote and wasteful was highly controversial and yet his vision of gardens based upon flowing arrangements of locally adapted winter-hardy plants eventually triumphed and has proved the most enduring.

Robinson’s lifelong friend Gertrude Jekyll was strongly influenced by The Wild Garden, and her own garden at Munstead Wood and many of her designs for others heartily embraced approaches outlined in The Wild Garden. Robinson’s philosophies benefited from being very much in sync with the increasingly popular British Arts and Crafts movement’s ethics linking beauty with utility and promoting an appreciation of local materials and patterns. England’s increasing industrialization was re-making much of the countryside and eliminating or modifying beyond recognition many of the semi-wild places previously taken for granted. Robinson’s idea of conserving some of this wildness within gardens was well-reasoned and well-timed.

Though Robinson was just thirty-two when the first edition of The Wild Garden appeared, he brought to it a wealth of experience and knowledge. Robinson’s professional career began in Ireland, as a gardener for the private estates Curraghmore House and, later, Ballykilcavan. He left Ireland for England in 1861 armed with a letter of introduction from David Moore, the director of Ireland’s National Botanic Garden in Glasnevin, Dublin, and secured a position with the Royal Botanic Society’s garden in Regent’s Park, London. Robinson was responsible for the herbaceous plantings, which then included a small section of British wildflowers. Here he began developing his extensive field knowledge of the English flora, exploring the countryside to study plants in their habitats and to collect material for the garden. In 1863 he received support for a month-long tour of botanical gardens and nurseries in England, Scotland, and Ireland which considerably broadened his knowledge of the world’s flora in cultivation.

Robinson’s career as a writer began in earnest that year with a long series of articles describing the tour, running until 1865 in The Gardener’s Chronicle. His further touring, writing, and work for the Royal Botanic Society obviously made a fine impression among his peers: in 1866 he was elected as a Fellow of the Linnean Society, his nomination sponsored by Charles Darwin and many other preeminent British scientists and horticulturists. Later that year Robinson resigned his position at Regent’s Park to devote himself to further studies and to his ambitions as a writer and publisher.

Long visits to France beginning in 1867 resulted in Robinson’s first two books; Gleanings from French Gardens (1868) and The Parks, Promenades and Gardens of Paris (1869). His 1868 travels were devoted to high mountain and alpine habitats in France, Switzerland, and Italy, and from these Robinson produced Alpine Flowers for English Gardens, published in 1870, the same year as Mushroom Culture and The Wild Garden.

Robinson also sailed to North America in August 1870, traveling by train across the continent and back just a year after the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed. He returned to England in December, and although this was too late to provide material for the first edition of The Wild Garden, his observations of diverse North American natural habitats and the connections he made with leading botanists deeply informed his subsequent writing and books, including the fifth edition of The Wild Garden. In New England Robinson met Harvard’s Asa Gray, who was then the leading expert on the North American flora. In New York he visited Central Park, just then nearing completion, with its superintendent and principal designer Frederick Law Olmsted. Robinson got his first glimpse of the desert on his way to California, where he explored the high Sierras with the assistance of California’s great botanists Albert Kellogg and Henry Bolander.

In 1871 Robinson launched his weekly journal, The Garden, and served as its editor for twenty-nine years. Devoted to a wide array of garden and landscape subjects, The Garden drew from Robinson’s extraordinary connections and included contributions from many of the period’s most knowledgeable, progressive thinkers and doers. He began using engravings done from original works of accomplished artists to illustrate The Garden, a practice he eventually introduced to his books. The second edition (1881) of The Wild Garden benefited greatly from this, with its pages enlivened by nearly a hundred illustrations by British artist Alfred Parsons. The exquisite line drawings and engravings from Parsons’ paintings portrayed individual plants and broad landscapes and were retained in all later editions.

Robinson was clearly proud of The Wild Garden and recognized the enduring relevance of the concept. Many of his later books included a chapter on the wild garden, including his immensely successful title The English Flower-Garden (1883) and The Garden Beautiful: Home Woods, Home Landscape (1906).

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Produktinformationen

Titel
The Wild Garden
Untertitel
Expanded Edition
Autor
Beiträge von
EAN
9780881929553
ISBN
978-0-88192-955-3
Format
Fester Einband
Herausgeber
Workman
Genre
Natur & Technik
Anzahl Seiten
356
Gewicht
1208g
Größe
H226mm x B224mm x T25mm
Jahr
2009
Untertitel
Englisch
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